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Multimedia Production

CD-ROMs have become commonplace, but effective use of multimedia for teaching skills cost-effectively remains a major challenge.

 

TBA recently assisted its partner Recruit Co., Ltd. in Japan in the design and production of a CD-ROM version of our Consultative Selling Skills program, an especially complex undertaking. 

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The project had to accommodate Japanese operating systems, double-byte language characters, and a tradition of excellence in graphics in Japan.

TBA's U.S. multimedia producers gave definition to the project in terms of:

  • Scope of effort
  • Graphic design
  • Interactive design
  • Development phases
  • Deliverables
  • Commitments
  • Schedule
  • Budget

TBA introduced many design options, including:

  • Gameware to ensure user's active engagement
  • Live case applications alternating with segments of self-paced learning
  • Use of a visual metaphor and advanced multimedia effects to maintain motivation among audiences who have grown up with video games

Within the budget required, TBA broke out specific line items for:

  • Project start-up
  • Content assessment
  • Copy/text/script development
  • Navigation and logic
  • Graphic design and production
  • Programming
  • Testing and revisions
  • Video production
  • Print design

SAMPLE VIDEO SCRIPT FOR SKILLS MODELING

Sample video script for skills modeling

Here is an actual video script produced by TBA that is quick-paced and realistic for the client.  It provides multiple learning points, and is relatively inexpensive to produce.

 

SCENE SIX

SOUND LEVEL DOWN AS JEAN, LISA, PAUL, AND HERB CONFER ABOUT NEXT WEEK'S MEETING.

THEN CUT TO A MEETING SHOWING JEAN REILLY AND HERB NELSON MEETING WITH PAUL JENSEN AND BOB PEARSON (THE ACCOUNT CONSULTANT).  PAUL IS SEEN INTRODUCING BOB TO JEAN AND HERB, AND THEY SIT DOWN TO BEGIN DISCUSSION, AS NARRATOR'S VOICE-OVER SETS UP PORTION OF CONVERSATION THAT VIEWER WILL HEAR.

 

NARRATOR

The following week Jean Reilly meets with Account Consultant Bob Pearson.

PAUL

State General Benefit

State Probable Need

Some of your plants produce key components that are assembled elsewhere into end products  It's efficient, but it creates the danger that a loss affecting one plant will curtail production at the other plants.

BOB

Tell How You Can Help

Paul and I feel this may be where we can help you, by preventing those losses or mitigating them when they do occur.

JEAN

Clear Need

Useful Remark

Good.  Of course, we're developing contingency plans, but we'd much prefer that nothing go wrong in the first place.

BOB

Support (Agree)

Propose General Solution

Restate Need / Support (Agree)

Present Options (#1)

Right!  That's the challenge

In a sense we have started to meet this challenge already.  We've already begun collecting information on exact structure of the interdependencies among your plants, alternative sources, if any, of parts and components, and contingency plans where they exist.  That's the first stage of dealing with the problem: understanding exactly the problem is. In this case, it means looking at various loss scenarios and analyzing how they would affect your whole production picture.

JEAN

Very good...

BOB

Present Options (#2)

There is a second process we can use to tailor our services to your requirements.  Once we have the various loss scenarios, we can determine which have the greatest potential to do damage—which most likely involve the most potential damage.  and which would have the greatest impact elsewhere, at other plants?  We establish priorities so we know which situations most urgently deserve attention.

JEAN

Useful Remark

 

That make sense.  Go on.

BOB

Support (Expand)

This preliminary analysis can save you a lot of misdirected effort and resources when you develop ways of preventing or mitigating loss.

Present Options (#3)

 

Expand with benefits and drawbacks

And there's a third element.  Beginning with the locations that most deserve attention, we will formulate loss prevention and loss control strategies.  These will be both comprehensive and concrete, stating exactly what should be done in specific terms—for instance, where firewalls should be installed and sprinkler systems installed or upgraded....

JEAN

Unclear Need

Here's where we run into a problem.  I don't want somebody charging into our plants overseas—and telling them they have to install a sprinkler system they don't want and don't feel they need and can't afford.

PAUL

Open Probe

 

Why is that?

JEAN

Misunderstanding

It's not part of the culture in Europe.  That wouldn't help us.  And, local management would be opposed to the cost.

BOB

Explain

Provide correct information

I understand the cultural difference and the concern about cost.  Our strategies will be comprehensive, which means they include many options—all of which can improve the situation.  They may call for major physical changes and modifications like a new sprinkler system, but we recognize that certain clients may be reluctant to implement them.  So there will be other recommendations, other alternatives, more in line with local practice and prevention philosophies.

Physical changes are just one element of the strategies we develop.

Expand with benefits

We will also make management program recommendations.  They're just as important—matters like emergency planning, or communications and training, or setting up programs to ensure fire equipment is regularly inspected and maintained.

PAUL

Expand with benefits (cont'd)

In other words, whatever the location, we'll include recommendations and options that are well suited to the local situation.

JEAN

Useful Remark

 

Good!  When it comes to loss prevention, we should be satisfied with the implementation in every location.

BOB

Support (Expand)

Absolutely.  We can provide technical assistance at the local level to make sure recommendations are implemented as they should be.  We can specify the scope of these services up front, for your approval.

After that, we can make regular visits to make sure  proper loss prevention control is being maintained.  And here, as in other parts of the program I'm describing, the frequency of visits can be set up to correspond with yours and the wishes of line management.

JEAN

Sounds good to me.

HERB

Thank you, Bob.  [SOUND DOWN]

THE CONVERSATION PROCEEDS AS NARRATOR IS HEARD AGAIN.

NARRATOR

In the following weeks, there will be other conversations between Jean and Herb, and the client.  The end result is a revised proposal that seems well crafted to meet the needs of the customer...and of the client.

TRAIN-THE-TRAINER OPTION

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